How to Take Advantage of Long Tail in SEM and SEO Seo and Sem

Let’s look at two hypothetical campaigns to demonstrate how Long Tail techniques work for both SEO and SEM.

AdWords: Long Tail in AdWords is an excellent technique to get good performance and cost reduction in a campaign. The basic idea is to reach the same number of visits, using a greater number of words, and reducing costs. This concept is best explained with two examples.

Let’s assume your task is to put together a “Trip Campaign” that requires some hits per month. The first example will be a campaigned without Long Tail and the second one with Long Tail.

1 ) Campaign without Long Tail. – The simple logic of any advertiser would be to have the Keyword “Trip” as his workhorse. Suppose that keyword gets about 500,000 visits per month, and has a higher cost per click, that means it has a lot of competition. Assuming you have a cost of 2.50 for the first 3 positions. This means that you would be on target at a cost of $1,250,500.

2) Campaign with Long Tail.- Taking into account the very significant cost difference that exist in Google between requested keywords and the ones that do not have many visits, let’s take advantage of it.

In a Long Tail campaign I would look for these “Hypothetical” keywords with the following results:

“One day trips” ===> $ 0.50 cents ==> 12,500 views
“Vacation trips” ===> $ 0.60 cents ==> 16,000 views
“Kayaking trips ” ==> $ 0.10 cents ==> 5,540 views
“Dream trips” ==> $ 0.20 cents ==> 6,500 views
“Canoeing trips” ==> $ 0.20 cents ==> 6,500 views

Total visits: 47,040
Average Cost: $ 0.32
Cost of Campaign: $ 15,052.80

In this hypothetical situation, you can see clearly that to lengthen the tail the low-performing keywords will end up having better performance results than well-placed words. And the more you lengthen the tail, it will perform better. Imagine this situation with a normal campaign of 30 words, versus the same situation with 700/800 long tail keywords, the difference is considerable. Even though Long Tail theory may seem fairly coherent, few users (except those experimented) use it.

In SEO the logic to follow is the same, except for the fact that you don’t have a cost per keyword. If you have to meet with a target number of hits per month, the best would not be pointing to the keyword with more monthly visits. Since it’ll have high competition and will take longer to position.

The best thing would be to focus on three or four keywords with less visits and fast positioning, but when added all together, it will hold as much as a “Hot Keyword”